California Code of Civil Procedure 874.318California Code of Civil Procedure 874.318

California Code of Civil Procedure 874.318 is the California partition statute that explains partition alternatives under the California Partition of Real Property Act. The statute provides that:

(a) If all the interests of all cotenants that requested partition by sale are not purchased by other cotenants pursuant to Section 874.317, or if after conclusion of the buyout under Section 874.317 a cotenant remains that has requested partition in kind, the court shall order partition in kind unless the court, after consideration of the factors listed in Section 874.319, finds that partition in kind will result in great prejudice to the cotenants as a group. In considering whether to order partition in kind, the court shall approve a request by two or more parties to have their individual interests aggregated.

(b) If the court does not order partition in kind under subdivision (a), the court shall order partition by sale pursuant to Section 874.320 or, if no cotenant requested partition by sale, the court shall dismiss the action.

(c) If the court orders partition in kind pursuant to subdivision (a), the court may require that one or more cotenants pay one or more other cotenants amounts so that the payments, taken together with the value of the in-kind distributions to the cotenants, will make the partition in kind just and proportionate in value to the fractional interests held.

(d) If the court orders partition in kind, the court shall allocate to the cotenants that are unknown, unlocatable, or the subject of a default judgment, if their interests were not bought out, a part of the property representing the combined interests of these cotenants as determined by the court.
Should the non-partitioning co-owners refuse to buyout the partitioning co-owners as described in California Code of Civil Procedure 874.317, the Partition of Real Property Act then allows courts to order a partition in kind, or physical division of the property. A partition in kind is feasible so long as it does not “result in great prejudice to the cotenants as a group.” Note that a partition in kind is usually only an available remedy for vacant land. For single family homes and most other property with structures, a partition by sale is ordered instead and, under the Partition of Real Property Act, at least one co-owner must have requested the sale.

Contact an Experienced Partition Attorney in California

If you want to end your co-ownership relationship, but your co-owner won’t agree, a partition action is your only option. Our experienced partition lawyers have years of experience ending co-ownership disputes and can help you unlock the equity in your property. For a free, 15 minute consultation with an experienced partition attorney at Talkov Law, call (844) 4-TALKOV (825568) or fill out a contact form online.