Tax

501(c)(4) is the second most common basis of tax-exemption after 501(c)(3). 501(c)(4) social welfare organizations include several well-known advocacy organizations including the Sierra Club, the ACLU, Planned Parenthood, the NRA, and AARP. However, the majority of 501(c)(4) organizations – an estimated 85 percent – do not engage in  issue advocacy, lobbying, support for candidates and ballot initiatives, and partisan voter

Stay informed of the week’s notable events and shared resources with this curated list of Nonprofit Tweets of the Week.

Notable Events of the Week:

  • “After Tyre Nichols Death, Officials’ Moves Reflect a Shift in Handling Police Violence With cameras nearly everywhere, and residents wary, the authorities are moving faster and speaking critically when officers are accused of beatings.”

Among the many provisions of the SECURE 2.0 legislation are a number of provisions designed to encourage employees to participate in and contribute to their employer provided retirement plan. Still other provisions provide more access to money in such plans under certain circumstances. This article will address provisions that encourage participation. A subsequent article will cover accessing retirement plan money.

For COVID relief, both the federal government and some state governments had funds for individuals/households. Congress created Economic Impact Payments (recovery credits) which were specified as not taxable and states followed that. Some states such as California had additional relief such as the Golden State Stimulus payments where were labeled as a one-time tax refund and available only to individuals

To be or stay exempt under section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, an organization must be operated exclusively for one or more of the exempt purposes described in section 501(c)(3) (“exempt purposes”). The first part of a compliance analysis with respect to this requirement referred to as the Operational Test is to examine whether the organization is actually operating

Among the many changes to retirement plans made by the SECURE 2.0 legislation are changes meant to encourage more employers to adopt retirement plans for their employees. Additionally there are provisions simplifying many rules of operating plans and provisions encouraging employees to participate and save for retirement. This article will discuss a couple of provisions encouraging employers to adopt plans.

The Committee on Nonprofit Organizations of the American Bar Association’s Business Law Section is calling for nominations for the “2023 Outstanding Nonprofit Lawyer Awards.”  The Committee presents the Awards annually to outstanding lawyers in the categories of Academic, Attorney, Nonprofit In-House Counsel, and Young Attorney (under 35 years old or in practice for less than 10 years).  The Committee will

Fiscal sponsorship can be an effective and efficient alternative to starting and operating a new nonprofit organization. But there are great variations in how fiscal sponsorship relationships are established and memorialized in a written agreement. One of the first areas of confusion is who enters into the agreement with the fiscal sponsor. These are the common possibilities:

  • Nonprofit organization without

A provision of the SECURE 2.0 legislation will affect an employer’s decision as to whether to adopt a 401(k) plan or 403(b) plan. The provision requires most 401(k) plans and 403(b) plans (Plans) adopted after the date of enactment of SECURE 2.0 (December 29, 2022) to automatically enroll eligible employees with an automatic contribution that will automatically escalate each year