California Workplace Law Blog

Insight & Commentary on California Workplace Law Issues & Developments

1. What’s changing?

Under the current version of the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), an employer’s obligations related to the personal information it collects from employees, applicants, and contractors residing in California (collectively, “Employment Information”) are relatively limited.  Specifically, it needs to (1) provide those individuals a “notice at collection” that discloses the categories of personal information the employer collects

On September 27, 2022, California Governor Gavin Newsom signed Senate Bill (SB) 1162, which requires certain employers to provide more pay transparency on pay scales and expands pay data reporting obligations for other employers. The new obligations take effect on January 1, 2023.

Pay Transparency

Previously, under California law, employers had to provide an applicant with the pay scale

On September 18, 2022, Governor Newsom signed California Assembly Bill (AB) 2188, which makes it unlawful for an employer to discriminate against a person in hiring, termination, or any term or condition of employment based upon: (1) a person’s use of cannabis off the job and away from the workplace, except for preemployment drug screenings, or (2) an employer-required

As Monkeypox (MPX) continues to be an issue throughout California, Cal/OSHA issued guidance to assist in protecting employees. However, this guidance applies only to workplaces covered by the Aerosol Transmissible Diseases (ATD) standard, which is notable because the guidance itself states that “MPX spreads primarily by close or direct contact with infectious rashes, lesions, scabs, or body fluids.” However, the

California’s Governor signed Assembly Bill (AB) 2273, the first of its kind state legislation that requires businesses that provide online services, products, or features likely to be accessed by children to comply with specified standards.
Read the full article at Jackson Lewis’ Workplace Privacy, Data Management & Security Report.

On Labor Day, Governor Newsom signed Assembly Bill (AB) 257, known as the FAST Recovery Act. The Act establishes a Fast Food Council comprising fast food employees, worker advocates, franchisors, franchisees, and government officials from the Department of Industrial Relations and the Governor’s Office of Business and Economic Development. The Council will have the authority to set industry-wide minimum

The California Court of Appeal for the Second Appellate District upheld the construction industry collective bargaining agreement exemption to the Private Attorneys General Act (PAGA) in Oswald v. Murray Plumbing and Heating Corporation.
Labor Code Section 2699.6
Under Labor Code section 2699.6, construction employees who perform work under a valid collective bargaining agreement (CBA) in effect any time before January

On September 5, 2022, California passed Assembly Bill (AB) 257, titled the Fast Food Accountability and Standards Recovery Act, or the “FAST Recovery Act.” AB 257 establishes a Fast Food Council comprised of fast food employees, worker advocates, franchisors, franchisees, and government officials within the Department of Industrial Relations that would set industry-wide standards for wages, working hours, and

Employers in California are faced with a myriad of complex federal and state laws.  It does not stop there.  An employer with employees working in the City of Oakland may also need to comply with local ordinances.
The following is an overview of employment regulations in Oakland.
Minimum Wage
Like several other cities in California, Oakland has its own citywide